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20121027
20121104
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KPIX (CBS) 19
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English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
the buckeye battleground. and back on track, jim axelrod shows us a runner on a mission to turn the lives of the homeless around, step-by-step. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> glor: good evening, i'm jeff glor. hurricane sandy is roughly 400 miles off north carolina tonight threatening up to 60 million on the east coast. here is the latest: 65 people across the caribbean are dead. airlines have canceled more than 6,000 flights. amtrak has canceled all trains along the northeast corridor monday. hundreds of thousands are evacuating coastal areas. ten states have declared a state of emergency. we have a team of correspondents tracking the storm tonight and we begin with our hurricane consultant david bernard at wfor in miami. david, parts of the coast already seeing the effects of sandy. what happens over the next 24 hours? >> reporter: jeff, it's a big storm and when we take a look at the clouds and radar together, they have been getting hammered in eastern north carolina and virginia, with big rains across the coast causing plenty of flooding. that is just t
low ma particular now. >> still to come on 49er preview, we sit down with jim harbaugh. next. ,,,,,,,,,,,, for kickoff...another primee game for jim harbaugh...i ct up w he prepares fo . >>> counting down to kickoff, another prime time came for jim harbaugh. i caught up with the coach as he prepares for his first of two monday night games this season. >> i saw a number today that was interesting, that the nfc west teams, all four in the nfc west are all within the top ten defensively and it is a very physical game against seattle. do you see this division as a much more physical division, defensively, than it was last year? >> well, it was pretty darn physical last year, i have to say. it was physical out there the other night, our game with seattle. i thought it was a great game, great football game. whether you are talking college football or pro football, one of the best games that i had a chance to witness in the last decade. both teams played their guts out. these guys got out to a 4-0 start. and skelton, they only had 11 points in there. he did do damage against the 49e
are getting a little fed up. jim axelrod is there tonight. jim. >> reporter: well, scott, this water-filled tunnel behind me is just one of the many challenges sandy has left for new yorkers who are facing a transportation nightmare. on this road into new york city, gasoline may be hard to find, but frustration summer is not. >> get in front of me! get in front of me! if it makes you happy. >> reporter: supply isn't the problem. it's the power blackouts that are keeping pumps from operating. >> move it! move it! >> reporter: aaa says just a third of stations are open in new jersey and long island. this line was three hours long. >> worth the wait. >> reporter: hours waiting for gas is followed by hours to get over a bridge or through a tunnel. to reduce congestion, police are turning away cars with less than three people until midnight tomorrow. >> move the line to the front! let's go! >> reporter: new york city buses resumed running today, and they were crammed tight. cedric taylor is a security guard headed back to work. >> you have to be patient because they're slowly trying to re
west, jim aelrod is in downtown maattan at t tip of m a what's tt there? >> reporter: anthousny, j with the last hour the rain has startedo intensify, the wind has picked up. you can hear a sound as the wind whips through the skyscrapers of lower manhattan that sound like a jet engine and it seems as though new york is really about to feel the full force of hurricane sandy. the big concern is the water right over my shoulder. all eyes are on the sea wall. if that water comes up over the sea wall and works its way into the electricity generating equipment that's in lower manhattan and into the subway stations in lower manhattan there could be very serious implications. anthony? >> mason: jim axelrod, thanks, jim. that was dramatic rescue at sea aboard a ship you may recognize from the movies. and two presidential campaigns are derailed by a hurricane. that's ju,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >> mason: the hurricane forced the presidential candidates to suspend their campaigning for a couple days. john dickerson is our political director. john, with just a week until election day, how is this going t
help your family. >> pelley: reports from jim axelrod, anna werner and seth doane. anemployment rises. the economy creates more jobs, but not enough. anthony mason on the final economic report before the election. >> we're four days away from a fresh start. h we made real progress these past four years. >> reporter: a campaign 2012 report from bob schieffer. and "on the road." steve hartman with children of the storm. silver linings in a dark week. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pel >> pelley: good evening. 110. that's the new death toll from hurricane sandy, and it's not likely to stop there. bodies are being found today in homes as rescue workers reach into the hardest-hit areas. the pictures that struck us today were of just one family in staten island, new york. 14-year-old kate at her grandparent's house. her mother, julie, trying to pull something recognizable from the rubble. and sheila and dominick trayna holding on to their memories and contemplating the future. the insurance industry es
and new jersey. jim axelrod is at battery park in manhattan, which was inundated with water. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. high tide has come here. at least in this part of battery park, the water is not threatening to come over the wall, which is at least one piece of good news in a city that is facing more than its share of trouble. superstorm sandy made landfall late monday. a wet and windy nightmare. >> we knew that this was going to be a very dangerous storm and the storm has met our expectations. >> reporter: actually, sandy exceeded them. around 9:00 pm the storm produced a record surge at battery park in manhattan, 14.88 feet breaching the sea wall and flooding the area. manhattan's waterfront seemed to disappear as the surge rushed over the wall. >> it's the unknown. it's the storm of the century. >> reporter: roads and cars were quickly covered, ground zero was en engulfed and across the harbor in brooklyn, so much flooding at coney island that emergency responders couldn't reach the area. the corrosive sea water headed undergrou
to people who are trying to get back on their feet. as jim axelrod reports discovering the benefits of running is more than physical. >> reporter: you might say ann has been running from her problem for years. >> it tore my family apart and it caused hardship and heartache and struggles. >> reporter: that wouldn't do justice to her powerful journey. her father was an alcoholic with a gambling problem. the best prescription for her pain she found was to run. every morning she passed a homeless shelter where the men would cheer her on. >> i realized that here i get to be the runner and they get to be the homeless guys. why can't we all be the runners? >> reporter: hoping to build their self-esteem she started a running club for them. >> i felt i could help my dad in a way i couldn't back then by helping these guys. >> reporter: six years later she's the ceo of back on my feet a nonprofit with branches in nine cities helping the homeless restart their lives. she just opened one at the bowery mission in new york. one rule. no slackers. >> you have to sign a piece. paper that says you'll
returning, and jim axelrod takes us down under. >> reporter: where are we? >> we're down here at the main exit and entrance of south ferry terminal. >> reporter: joe leader of m.t.a. transportation took us down for a look at the hardest hit of all 468 new york city subway stations. south ferry, at the southern tip of manhattan. >> we had barricaded up top with wood plywood and sandbags to keep the water out, but when the surge came, it brought down all this material that doesn't belong here. large pieces of lumber, and that broke through the barrier and allowed more water to come in. >> reporter: that's water just a few steps down from the top of the steps. but the tracks are another two levels underneath that. so as much as the water's gone down, we're still two levels worth of water till we get to the tracks? >> absolutely. >> reporter: it will take a week alone just to pump out the water. but the subway system will begin limited service tomorrow. limited mass transit has left city streets choked with cars, a telling sign of just how badly the city needs to ease the stress on the roads.
evacuated. jim axelrod has more from lower manhattan. >> reporter: good morning. new yorkers pride themselves on being intrepid. and right now we still have some people walking along the wall here in lower manhattan. in a couple of hours if they're here, we'll have to look for another adjective other than intrepid. the big worry here is that the surge of water could be as high as 11, 12 feet. that would get over the wall, into the subway systems and electrical systems, and that's what the big catastrophic worry is here in lower manhattan. the transit system shut down schools shut down. 375,000 people from the lowest lying areas in new york have been evacuated as the biggest city braces for the impacts of hurricane sandy. charlie? >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> meteorologist from cbs 4 has been watching sandy closely. jeff, this is getting scary based on reports you're pulling in. it sounds like this is getting worse. >> good morning, nor amp good morning, everyone. yeah. this storm is getting a little bit worse in the atlantic now. you see that the core of th
but not the other. details coming up. >> what do turkeys and football have in common? jim harbaugh will explain that. i'm dennis o'donnell. and a look at the warriors center of attention and will he play in tomorrow night's opener? ,,,,,,,,,,,, hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ...and now... you! [ giggles ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios each other, do >>> they may be man's best friend but when it comes to helping each other, dogs can go above and beyond. cbs 5's frank mallicoat on how some extraordinary animals are literally sticking their necks out to save lives. >> come here, girl. >> reporter: debbie gross and her husband bruce love their weimar ranker dogs. they are like family. >> it was scary. >> reporter: the couple prepared to do all they could to save her life when she was diagnosed with cancer. >> she was 9 and we wanted to give her the best possible chance that she had. and so we went forth with the surgery. >> reporter: tori needed a blood transfusi
sandoval during today's batting practice. it's only going to get colder as the night goes on. manager jim leyland thinks a little home dugout advantage will help the tigers. >> we've got heaters in the dugout for both teams obviously. ours is going to be a little warmer than theirs, but that's all right. we won't tell them that. >> if i'm thinking about how cold it is, it means i'm not thinking about what's going on on the mound. >> the beer is cold. everything is cold. it's great. >>> last night, when doug fister got hit in the head by a grego blanco comeback, remarkably, he stayed in the game, giving up just one run in six innings. >> i talked to him on the plane and i had a nice conversation with him. i'm a little worried about it, because this morning he didn't remember our conversation. no. i'm just kidding. he's gonna be checked out today. >>> the nhl season took a big hit today. the nhl announced they have cancelled all games in november as the owners and players are still at odds about revenue sharing in the league. they will lose an estimated $720 million. >>> it is time for your
, but the subways are still closed. jim axelrod is in lower manhattan. >> the sea water that came over that wall and flooded the underground power stations and subway stations has crippled lower manhattan. and one transit official says this is the gravest disaster the new york transit system has ever faced. superstorm sandy may have moved on, but parts of new york city remain paralyzed in her wake. >> restoring power and mass transit remain the two biggest challenges in the days ahead. that recovery is a mammoth job. >> it's the worst thing that happened to this city, certainly, since 9/11. >> reporter: new york city's subway system, which averages more than 5 million commuters per workday is closed indefinitely because all seven subway tunnels linking manhattan to brooklyn and queens are flooded. at some stations near battery park, where monday's surge of seawater hit hardest, stairwells look more like swimming pools. >> there was no way to prepare that would have kept the water out? >> no. >> officials say sandy is the biggest disaster to ever hit the new york transit system. so severe that fe
asleep. >> reporter: scientists call jim a night owl, and christine a lark, a morning person. and it's all determined from the day we were born. >> you've got to look into your dna and blame it there. this is something you've inherited from your parents. >> you can't change from the a morning to a night person. you just have to adjust. he's been studying biological clocks for more than three decades. >> by the time people are in their 60s, they find it hard to sleep in. they have that call, an internal rooster. >> whether you're a morning person, a lark or a night owl, scientists have discovered we're pretty much the same when it comes to peak times. that is the best time the do anything. >> best time to exercise? between 5 and 7:00 p.m. >> that's when our muscle strength is best. >> best time to negotiate a deal? 9 to 11 a.m >> it requires our ability to be reading how another person is reacting to us. and that interestingly is. is just after we get up. so if you're going to be buying a house, if you want to go into a car dealership at that time of day. >> reporter: best time to tak
. but service is limited and the city faces another day of serious transportation trouble. jim axelrod is at the tip of lower manhattan outside the staten island ferry terminal. good morning, jim. >> reporter: good morning. big step for new yorkers and a psychological boost, to at least have partial subway service restored and to ease some congestion on the roads. there won't be any subway trains coming in and out of here. not today, not tomorrow. not for a while, it would seem. three days after superstorm sandy swept through new york, the city's road to recovery is literally gridlocked. >> traffic is terrible, man. takes 45 minutes just for four block blocks. it's horrible. >> reporter: commuters turned manhattan streets into parking lots. a telling sign of just how badly the city needs its mass transit system back. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: this morning 14 out of 23 subway lines will begin operating. but none will be able to run below 34th street in manhattan and into brooklyn. multiple tunnels and stations in that area remain flooded with sea water.
, and it's only going to get colder as the night goes on. manager jim leland thinks a little home dugout advantage will help the tigers. >> they have all kind of stuff. we have heaters in the dugout for both teams, obviously. ours is going to be a little warmer than theirs i think tomorrow night but that's all right. we won't tell them that. you can't be worried about how cold it is. i threw a game in chicago last year, where it was 34 degrees and it was raining and sleeting. and i threw the emball pretty well that night. so i don't suspect the cold weather's going to be much of an issue. >> if i'm thinking about how cold it is, it means i'm not thinking about what donald rumsfelding on the mound. >> cold for everybody. cold for the fans, the beer's cold. enjoy it. >> the n.h.l. has announced they've cancelled all games for november. so pavelski is playing in russia. a pretty pass by pavelski to stapleton on the goal. that is a look at sports. see you tonight at 5:30. >>> coming up, one more look at today's top stories, including where people are braising for heavy snow and rain from hur
an explosion at a con-edison electrical substation. a quarter of a million homes and businesses lost power. jim axelrod reports the trouble was just beginning. >> reporter: workers are now taking down the boards that were supposed to keep water out of subway stations and loading sandbags back on to the truck. having done their best in a battle they could have never won. there was no way to prepare that would have kept the water out? >> no, no. no way. how are you going to stop water? water does what it wants to do. >> reporter: seven tunnels linking manhattan to brooklyn and queens are flooded. the signals, switches and third rails are covered with sludge. m.t.a. workman john o'neil went down for a look in the south ferry station and reported back. >> it's probably up to the two poles from the top. full to the top. forget about it. >> reporter: even after the water has gone away, 6,200 subway cars must be inspected along with 600 miles of track and 468 subway stations. >> the m.t.a. last night faced a disaster as devastating at it has ever faced. >> reporter: joe loda is chairman of the metropo
this morning while drivers could see another day of serious gridlock. jim axelrod is in lower manhatt manhattan. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. this gives you a pretty god idea of what the commute is like on this friday morning. the traffic signals are out. because there's no power. that creates quite a bit of chaos at the intersections as these negotiations go on about who is going to get the right of way. all over the city, as we said, chaos. the bridges and tunnels choked with vehicles. traffic stretching for miles. through midnight tonight police will continue to turn away cars with less than three passengers. public transportation, lines for shuttle buses reached three hours yesterday. getting rid of water that's still flooding out tums and roads. tough job here. army corps of engineers is here to help, planning to suck out 10 million gallons. trucks being air lifted here to help restore power. pretty simple equation. the quicker they get power on, the quicker the congestion will be reduced around new york. con ed, the power company that takes care of new york city says by tomorr
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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